Do Not Forget: This Morning Too, Has a Pulse

  On this day – at the time of inauguration of our country’s 45th President, we are no less in and of the reliable weave of relationship. Within the natural world. Within the social world – itself entirely an expression of nature. On this day – like all other days, a pulse. And wisdom – like Dr. Angelou’s in 1993 – it’s truth everpresent, whether seen and lived from or not. May… Read More

#NoDAPL – A Closer View from a Young Anishinaabe Woman

  More helpful words from another clear thinker. This time, a young woman. Kayla DeVault is an Anishinaabe, enrolled Shawnee. She lives on the Navajo nation where she is studying Diné studies at Diné College and working as a civil engineer for the Navajo Nation Division of Transportation. She is also a youth ambassador for Generation Indigenous who has attended meetings at the White House. Several weeks ago, she spoke before the leadership… Read More

Thanksgiving was Yesterday

  And, today Americans awaken to what the commercial conglomerate has named “Black Friday.” The term originated in 1951 in relation to industry and business owners noting the tendency of workers to call in sick the day after Thanksgiving in order to have a four-day weekend. By the 60’s the term was a derogation on the part of law enforcement officers in Philadelphia who had to deal with significantly increased pedestrian traffic on… Read More

Standing in Wildfire

Yesterday, my husband Gary and I began a drive to Montana.  We live there parts of the year.  Just outside a really small community tucked into muscular folds of the Intermountain West.  With water and trees, with big mammals like Elk, Moose and Bear – with Eagles and Hawks, and this past spring, with a mama hummingbird nested just outside our window. It was early when we left Portland – the place… Read More

Backward Thinking

Since 1996, I’ve included a suggestion in several syllabi for graduate courses.  Each of the courses was required in the curriculum of students preparing as social science practitioners:  therapists, educators, public administrators.  Each had significant content drawn from scientific knowledge bases.  And, because I was teaching them, each had significant content devoted to artistry. It’s been three decades since I made the decision to become an academic and devote my work life… Read More

A Heatwave of Independence

For three weeks plus, temperatures in Portland, Oregon have been above 90°.  There has been no rain since June 1.  I find myself longing for Slip&Slides, for Mr. Wiggle (video link for those who’ve forgotten – and for those who may have never known)  – and resorting instead to random sidesteps into the spray of lawn sprinklers. In Portland, and all across the Pacific Northwest, June has generally been a mostly rainy month. … Read More

Re: My Profession’s Role in Torture

I’m a professor of psychological and cultural studies.  Gary Snyder is a poet and essayist. In an interview in the Paris Review, Snyder spoke of writing as his work.  He spoke about integrity – in his work as a writer, and to my mind, immediately relevant to my profession – Psychology. This is what Snyder’s interviewer asked:  You’ve written, “Changing the filter, wiping noses, going to meetings, picking up around the house, washing… Read More